Filtering by Tag: Mexico

Afro-Latina actress Tessa Thompson saves the world in 'Men in Black: International'

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By Arturo Conde

Tessa Thompson considers herself Afro-Latina, a black woman, a person of color, and Latinx. But when fans go to see the sci-fi action blockbuster "Men in Black: International" this weekend, she hopes that they will only see her character, Agent M, on the silver screen.

“I hope we can get to the space in Hollywood where it’s not noteworthy for a woman, and particularly a woman of color, to top line a franchise film,” Thompson, who has Afro-Panamanian and Mexican roots, told NBC News. “I hope we can get to a place where we don’t have to congratulate it, or comment on it because it happens with such frequency. But we are still really far away from there.”

Read more: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/latino/afro-latina-actress-tessa-thompson-saves-world-men-black-international-n1017606

Somos raíz: afromexicanos rumbo al reconocimiento constitucional

Credit: Hugo Arrellanas/Chiapas Paralelo

Credit: Hugo Arrellanas/Chiapas Paralelo

Llegaron con los conquistadores a la Nueva España en 1580, antes de que México se convirtiera en un Estado Nación. Por las epidemias y los trabajos pesados, muchos indígenas murieron y el tráfico de esclavos africanos en Hispanoamérica aumentó. A 400 años de distancia, las personas afrodescendientes están por ser reconocidas como pueblo originario.

El Senado de la República aprobó una iniciativa que busca reconocer a los pueblos afrodescendientes en la Constitución Mexicana. Sin abstenciones ni votos en contra, la iniciativa de la Senadora Susana Harp va ahora por la aprobación en la Cámara de Diputados

La modificación del artículo 2, el cual aborda los temas de la composición pluricultural de la nación mexicana y las aportaciones de los pueblos originarios a la conformación del país, es una deuda contra la invisibilización de los afromexicanos en la historia del país

Lee Más: https://www.chiapasparalelo.com/noticias/chiapas/2019/05/somos-raiz-afromexicanos-rumbo-al-reconocimiento-constitucional/

Afro-Mexicans May Finally Get Recognition in the Mexican Constitution, But Many Say That’s Not Enough

Credit: Ebony Bailey for Remezcla

Credit: Ebony Bailey for Remezcla

Several months ago, we reported on the critical fallout from the film La Negrada, which attempted to depict a storyline about Afro-Mexicans only to be accused by Afro-Mexican civil society of perpetuating the same stereotypes. At the time, we noted the film work of a young Afro-Mexican film maker named Ebony Bailey who presented a different narrative from within the community. In this article she shares the journey for recognition currently happening for Afro-Mexicans

“We are talking about 450 years of invisibilization.” With these words, Gina Diédhiou echoes the sentiments of many Afro-Mexicans in the Latin American country. And after centuries of erasure (and because of the work of this community), Mexico is taking its first step in recognizing its Black population. Earlier this week, the Senate unanimously voted to approve recognition of Afro-Mexicans in the national constitution. Although full approval is still pending – the lower house of Mexican Congress still needs to vote on it – the Senate’s action has made history.

Read more: https://remezcla.com/features/culture/afro-mexicans-constitution-recognition/

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On the Coast of Oaxaca, Afro and Indigenous Communities Fight for Water Autonomy

Credit: NACLA/COPUDEVER

Credit: NACLA/COPUDEVER

At dawn on March 14—celebrated internationally as the Day of Action against Dams and in Defense of Rivers—Afro-Mexican, Indigenous, and mestizo peoples met on the shores of the Río Verde to participate in a ritual of gratitude and resistance.

They were gathered for the Río Verde Festival, organized each March by the Consejo de Pueblos Unidos en Defensa del Río Verde (Council of Peoples United in Defense of the Río Verde, COPUDEVER). This water protector movement was formed in 2007 when dozens of communities organized to stop the Federal Electricity Commission from building a hydroelectric dam on their river, which they say would flood their homes and contaminate their only source of water.

Read more: https://nacla.org/news/2019/05/07/coast-oaxaca-afro-and-indigenous-tribes-fight-water-autonomy